Are you required to wear a respirator?

SUMMARY

If wearing a respirator is required by your company then the 9 elements of the respiratory protection program must be followed including medical evaluation, training, and fit testing (http://lifeandsafety.com/enroll/#!/Respiratory-Protection/c/38135012/offset=0&sort=nameAsc). If you are voluntarily wearing respiratory protection you must be provided with the information in Appendix D.

FULL ARTICLE

There are many factors that affect whether you are required by OSHA to wear a respirator while working. Determining if it is required is the obligation of your employer. If it is required, then it is the employer’s responsibility to develop a respiratory protection program. “The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those set forth [for general industry] at 29 CFR 1910.134 of this chapter.” (https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1926/1926.103)

1910 (General Industry): https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.134

1926 (Construction): https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1926/1926.103

1910.134(c)(1):
In any workplace where respirators are necessary to protect the health of the employee or whenever respirators are required by the employer, the employer shall establish and implement a written respiratory protection program with worksite-specific procedures.” There are 9 OSHA required elements of this program:

  1. Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace
  2. Medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators
  3. Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators
  4. Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations
  5. Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding, and otherwise maintaining respirators
  6. Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity, and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying respirators
  7. Training of employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine and emergency situations
  8. Training of employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their use, and their maintenance
  9. Procedures for regularly evaluating the effectiveness of the program

1910.134(c)(2)(i):
“An employer may provide respirators at the request of employees or permit employees to use their own respirators, if the employer determines that such respirator use will not in itself create a hazard. If the employer determines that any voluntary respirator use is permissible, the employer shall provide the respirator users with the information contained in Appendix D to this section (“Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard”).”

Appendix D to Sec. 1910.134 (Mandatory) Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required Under the Standard: https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.134AppD

If you have questions or would like assistance in creating and implementing any element of your respiratory protection program please don’t hesitate to contact us by phone (864.297.4521) or email (info@lifeandsafety.com).

Both the medical evaluation and respiratory protection training can be completed online. More information can be found here: http://lifeandsafety.com/enroll/#!/Respiratory-Protection/c/38135012/offset=0&sort=nameAsc

COVID-19: What To Expect When You Return To Work

With people returning to work both employees and employers want to know what to expect when they walk into their workplace and how COVID-19 has change our work environment. 

COVID-19 Illustration
COVID-19
  • What new safety measures are in place to protect employees and the general public? 
  • What policies have been created or updated to better protect employees from infection? 
  • What are the responsibilities of the employee and the employer? 
  • How can we return to work with confidence? 

These are just a few of the questions that will be answered during this webinar.

The first portion of this webinar is a presentation just as we did in the last webinar. However, based on your suggestions, we added a question and answer section at the end.

What We’ve Learned About COVID-19

Over the last month we’ve seen a lot of changes take place in how we conduct business. From interfacing with the public to working from home, the face and features of our workplace have been drastically altered. Keeping up with the continually updating information, recommendations, and speculation that we receive daily has been overwhelming and can be more than a little confusing.

Our safety consultants, TC Gore and Joe Woodman, have been working diligently with clients to help them respond to current needs and prepare for what comes next. They’ve done this by taking their extensive medical and bio-hazard experience that they both have and coupling that with constant attention to the ever changing data coming from the CDC, OSHA, and other agencies and digesting all that information into meaningful and actionable next steps.

On Wednesday April 1st we hosted a a quick lunch and learn during which TC and Joe discussed what they’re doing to help business react and prepare for what comes next.

Safety Management Tools

By Nathan Bennett

Life and Safety Management Tools

In October of 2011 I started with Life and Safety and now, 8 years later, have seen our online services grow from a small OSHA 10 and 30 reseller service to a department that develops custom online training solutions for employee and contractor orientation as well as site and task specific training.

Inspections, Audits, Observations, and Assessments

Life and Safety creates custom training solutions for our clients and over the past 5 years we’ve built digital inspection solutions that allow operators and inspectors to complete their checklists on a smart device while in the field. There’s no need to carry a clipboard, complete paper forms, carry it back to the office, review the findings, forward for remediation, or file for retention. Everything is digital and stored in a database with immediate notification of deficiencies and the opportunity to respond effectively and efficiently to trouble areas while at the same time incentivizing positive behaviors such as completing inspections, audits, observations, and assessments.

contractor transcript safety management tools

Training Transcript Management

The newest tool we’ve added is the ability to access contractor training records immediately from anywhere. Instead of relying on wallet cards or word of mouth the contractor has a scannable code on their ID badge, hardhat, or something equally as accessible. The safety person can then scan that code and access all their training while verifying that they are trained to do their job tasks.

On the Horizon

We are continuously improving our online tools and processes with a few projects currently under development. The most exciting new tool we’re working on is an ISO certification process management tool. With it you’ll be able to manage your documentation and access it easily much in the same way that our contractor transcript tool works. More details about this new tool will become available after the first of the year.

Thank you to all our clients who have and continue to help us test and build these tools for safety.

Old School Versus the New Generation – Technology Transforms Safety

Safety, like anything else, has transformed throughout recent years with the addition of technological advances and improvements. Read how a once OSHA auditor in the 1990’s view this transformation, and it’s impact for the better.

My teenage kids think I worked in the dark ages when I started my career in the early 1990s, and when I look back on how technology has changed the work environment, I have to agree. How did we function?

I started my safety career working with OSHA as a compliance officer in the early 1990s and everything was manual!  We took pictures with black-and-white film and handwrote reports.  I did not even know what a computer mouse was and I had never heard of email before I left OSHA in 1995.  How did I complete the paperwork for a citation when I worked with OSHA?

Read more about how technology has transformed Safety in David Lynn’s article for EHS Today:

Old School Versus the New Generation – Technology Transforms Safety